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20 Years of Contributors

Volumes 1 (1976/77) - Volume 20 (1995-1996)

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
A-B-C
D-E-F-G
H-J-K-L
M-O-P-R
S-V-W

 

Volume:

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Dorsett to Gura
Helen Dorsett              
James (Jim) Dorsett  
Meghan Dorsett                                    
Don Dube                                        
Donald C. Eastin                                        
Joan Elliot                                        
Colin Farrer                                        
Marcy Fisher                                        
Christopher W. Futer                                        
Edward & Helen Gehrke                                        
John Gray                                    
Hillman R. Grosse                                      
Joseph J. Gura                                      

Helen Dorsett (NAME Academy of Honor; IGMA Crystal Award)

1920's French Provincial Chaise Lounge: 7:2 (46-52)
1920's Modern in Half-Inch Scale (4 Pieces): 11:4 (29-32)
1920's Unfinished Furniture: 13:3 (22-24)
1929 Artificial Christmas Tree: 8:1 (8-10)
A Sitting Room in Summer (Essay): 5:4 (4)
A Thoroughly Modern Tuxedo Sofa: 2:4 (26-31)
Accessories for an Early American Family Room (Model in a Minute): 3:3 (13-14)
Accessories Found and Made: (Part 1) 6:4 (51-52); (Part 2) 7:1 (27-28)
Arts & Crafts Bedroom Set (Mission Panel Bed, Bedside Stand, Chest of Drawers, and Princess Dresser): 14:1 (25-32)
Blond or Dark: Modern Classic: 4:4 (35-37)
The Broom and Dustpan (Model in a Minute): 13:2 (23-24)
Building Furniture with Commercial Turnings: Low Back Windsor Arm Chair: 8:2 (16-18)
Building the 1930 New England Shed: 9:2 (7-13)
Built-in Gardening Cabinets: 9:2 (14-17)
Caning: An Introduction to Hand-Woven Caning: 1:3 (35-38)
Caning: Contemporary Bamboo Headboard: 1:3 (42-45)
Caning: Late Empire Couch: 2:1 (55-59)
Caning: Victorian Factory Side Chair: 1:3 (39-41)
Changing Times: A 1930 American Kitchen: 9:1 (4-22)
A Child's Empire Rocker: 5:2 (9-11)
Child's Rocking Horse Chair: 11:4 (17-18)
Child-Size Vanity Dresser & Bench (c. 1929): 8:1 (6-8)
Chippendale Commode Chair: 5:3 (8-11)
Chippendale Federal Sofa (c. 1795-1805): 7:2 (26-28)
Chippendal Tea Kettle Stand (c. 1770): 14:1 (23-24)
Christmas on the G.I. Bill: 4:1(29-35)
A Combination Folding Bed: 4:4 (4-16)
A Connecticut High Chest of Drawers: 6:4 (9-12)
Contemporary Built-In Bookcase (1/2" scale): 11:1 (10-13)
The Cotswold Cottage: (Part 1) 10:4 (25-32); (Part 2) 11:1 (36-50); (Part 3) 10:2 (12-20)
Country Kitchen Cabinet (c. 1890), The Beginner's Workbench: 3:4 (46-51)
A Custom Kitchen in Record Time: 8:6 (4-11)
Cutting Dado & Rabbet Joints (Beginner's Workbench): 19:3 (5-11)
A Danish Modern Sideboard (Beginner's Workbench): 6:1 (15-17)
The Democrat Rocker (Empire Style, c. 1850-1860): 5:1 (28-31)
Detailing A Federal Period Row House (Part 1): TSC 2:4 (4-17) (Part 2 is listed as Planning a Kit-Bashed House in TSC 3:1)
A Doll's Folding Chair (c. 1900): 6:1 (18-20)
Dyeing with Natural Dyes: 1:4 (20-22)
Empire Clock: 4:2 (4-8)
Ethan Allen Arm Chair: 10:3 (21-28)
French Canadian Table & Armchair: 12:4 (14-17)
From Kit to Modern: Americana Chest: 1:2 (35-36)
From Country Store to Home: Accessories For an Early American Family Room (Model in a Minute): 3:3 (13-14)
From Kit Shell to Painted Lady: (Part 1) An Italianate Row House Front: 9:3 (7-13); (Part 2) Interior and Exterior Stairs: 9:4 (10-18); (Part 3) An Approach to Wiring and Interior Finish. 10:1 (34-37)
Furnishings for a Rustic Shed: 9:2 (18-22)
Half Inch Bed Step (c. 1810): 6:3 (25-26)
Half-Inch Overstuffed Furniture for Couch Potatoes: 12:3 (6-12)
Half-Inch Queen Anne Lowboy: 7:4 (50-51)
Half-Inch Windsor Side Chair: 7:1 (11-12)
The Hall Tree: A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery: 3:1 (15-20)
High Style: A New England Fancy Chair (1800-1820): 8:3 (36-38)
How I Built the Store: A Jack-Carpenter's Guide to Frame Construction: (Part 1) 6:4 (29-37); (Part 2) 7:1 (29-37); (Part 3): 7:3 (4-10)
How to Fill Your China Cabinet with Cardstock: 2:2 (38-43)
Hunting the Victoria Cabriole with Knife and Dental Burr:1:1 (16-18)
An Improvised Eastlake Couch: 5:4 (28-34)
John Hall Legacy: Pedestal Centre Table: 13:4 (7-11)
John Hall Legacy: Scroll-Cut Couch: 13:4 (12-17)
Knee-Deep in June: Leisure Furniture in the Early 1900s: 1:4 (23-32)
The Late Great Empire of John Hall. 4:1 (19-25)
Lazy Susan Apartment: (Part 1) 13:2 (25-35); (Part 2) 13:3 (7-11)
A Little Girl's Dream: 1938 Fiberboard Dollhouse: 6:1 (23-28)
Loop Back Windsor Chair: 12:3 (33-38)
Louis XIV Arm Chair: 11:4 (13-16)
Marble Wood Finishes: 14:1 (33-36)
Marbled Fireplace Mantle (c. 1872): 14:2 (35-42)
A Mid-Victorian Mixture: 4:2 (29-38)
Miniature Rooms: A Point of Reference: 1:1 (44-47)
A Mirror Image by Half: Modern Sofa in One Inch and Half Inch Scale: 9:3 (25-30)
Modern Dining Room Set in Half Inch: 9:4 (37-40)
Modern Pedestal Table: 10:4 (12-16)
Modern Swivel Chair (1/2" scale): 11:1 (14-16)
Modern Table & Chair (Beginner's Workbench): 5:4 (40-45)
Modern Walnut Folding Chair: 1:1 (11-13)
Modifying an Early American Secretary Kit: 1:1 (6-10)
Music in Their Homes: A Piano Stool and Embellishments For a Scientific Kit: 3:2 (42-46)
The Next Collectibles: 1949 Haywood-Wakefield Modern Bedroom Suite: 7:4 (29-39)
Nineteen Forties Federal: End Tables & Coffee Tables: 6:4 (48-50)

Oak & Artful Clutter: The TSC Cover Room: 11:3 (5-7)
Oak...from Wards: Art Nouveau Parlor Cabinet: 1:2 (37-41)
An Oak Coffee Table (Beginner's Workbench): 4:1(26-28)
Oak Dining Set in Half-Inch: 13:2 (36-39)
Of Castles and Kitchens: (Part 1) 1:4 (33-48); (Part 2) 2:1 (45-53)
Painted Empire Settee (c. 1840, Beginner's Workbench): 13:1 (13-20)
Parson's Table: Easier by the Dozen: 1:2 (17-19)
The Pawn: An Eastlake Nursing Chair: 9:2 (29-31)
Plain & Simple...Colonial Kitbashing: 11:2 (30-39)
Plastic Pipe Patio Furniture: 2:4 (54-55)
Room for Growth: A Beginner's Stenciled Room Setting: 5:3 (4-7)
Scientific's Secretary: the 2nd Time Around: 1:2 (13-16)
Shaker Cupboard Desk: 11:1 (22-28)
Shaker Pedestal Stand: 1:3 (29-30)
Slaw Bed: 1:2 (1-9)
Smithfield Plantation Round-About: 1:2 (26-30)
A Spanish Daybed Frame (New Mexico c. 1850): 4:3 (16-18)
Stenciled Floor Cloth: 8:2 (7-8)
A TV for Hand Tools: 6:3 (29-35)
Trickle-Down Furniture: A Chippendale Canopy Bed (c. 1770-1785): 7:3 (39-43)
A Touch of Grace: Queen Anne Cabriole Leg: 1:2 (23-25)
Tudor Swiveled Bookcase: 8:1 (34-36)
Two Occasional Pieces in Half Inch: 12:4 (39-40)
The Useless Presents of Christmas Morning: 2:1 (4-12)
Victorian Factory Chairs: 1:3 (49-52)
Victorian Settee: 1:1 (19-22)
Whats New? Not Much! American Standard Bathroom Fixtures (c. 1930):(Part 1) 8:3 (29-35); (Part 2) 8:5 (22-24)
When Less is Better: Modification of X-Acto Lowboy: 2:2 (17-21)
When Pedigree is Important: Modifying a Realife Wing Chair: 2:4 (32-36)
Where Simplicity is Virtue: Two 19th Century Country Kitchen Pieces: 1:3 (55-59)

The creative force behind The Scale Cabinetmaker, Helen began her modeling career through active involvement in model railroading in the late 1940s and 1950s, before turning her attention to dollhouse miniatures in 1960. She founded Dorsett Miniatures in 1960, drawing on her experience in model railroading and as a graduate student at the Chicago Art Institute in the early 1950s.

Initially, Helen specialized in Victorian miniatures, building primarly mid-Victorian furniture on commission for individual doll collectors, like Emma Poe, and dealers, like Miriam Peniston. In 1963, Emma Poe suggested that Helen write a book on how to build miniatures. The result was the first Cabinetmaker's Guide for Dollhouse Furniture, published in 1964--the first "how-to" book for dollhouse miniature published in the United States. Between the publication of the first Guide in 1964 and her death in 1990, Helen Dorsett built an impressive body of work in miniatures, including 9 books and many of the major articles in TSC. She had an equally impressive impact on the development and growth of the miniatures hobby.

Jim Dorsett (NAME Academy of Honor; IGMA Crystal Award)

1920's Kitchen Cabinet: 18:3 (35-40)
1- & 1/2 Scale Conversion Chart: 6:4 (28)
The Allure of the Antique: 18:4 (5)
Art Nouveau Revisited, Essay: 14:2 (25)
Arts & Crafts Bungalow Furniture: 20:2 (8-9)
Arts & Crafts Library Table & Chair: 20:2 (13-19)
Arts & Crafts Spindle Sofa: 20:2 (20-22)
Blue Line Oven/Stove: 13:3 (12-16)
Brass-Tube Casters: 15:2 (19-22)
Building a Simple Bookcase (Beginner's Workbench): 3:3 (43-52)
Case Construction with Hand Tools: 19:1 (25-28)
Casual Reminiscence: An Early American Family Room (Essay): 3:3 (4-5)
Chair Leg and Rung Assembly With Hand Tools (Beginner's Workbench): 8:2 (12-15)
Children's Furniture (Upholstered Club Rocker and Transitional Side Chair): 18:1 (44-49)
Chippendale Basin Stand: 16:3 (21-24)
Chippendale Comb-back Corner Chair: 18:4 (12-17)
Chippendale...With Some Changes (Essay): 8:3 (4-5)
Christiansburg Depot: Elevations (Scale 1/4": 1'): 9:3 (cf1-4)
Christmas in the Kitchen (1914): A TSC Cover Essay: 12:3 (5)
A Connecticut Colonial: The Whitman House: 1:1 (27-43); 1:2 (42-57); 1:3 (17-28); 1:4 (3-19)

Contemporary Mexican Cabinet: 17:2 (31-36)
Cottage Garden Suite: 10:2 (5-9)
Cottage Spindle Sofa from Kansas: 8:2 (29-35)
Country Living: Assembling the Realife Country Living Room Kit (essay): 8:2 (4-6)
The Craftsman Furniture of Gustav Stickley: 15:4 (5-21) (Includes Celandine Tea Table, c. 1900; Library Table & Chair, c. 1905-07; Hanging Book Shelf, c. 1905-07; Magazine Cabinet, c. 1910)
Craftsman in the Kitchen: A visit to Bill Miller's Workbench): 8:3 (26)
Curvilinear Measurement (Cabinetmaker's Shop Manual): 1:2 (31-34)
Decorating for a 1929 Christmas (essay): 8:1 (4-6)
Eastlake Caned, Swivel Office Chair: 17:2 (5-13)
Empire Extension Pedestal Table: 7:1 (36-44)
Empire Period Card Table: 16:2 (25-31)
Empire Twins: Clocks by Helen Dorsett and Horace Cooke: 4:2 (4-8)
English Gothic Library Table/Ladder: 15:2 (5-11)
Ethan Allen Heirloom Bedroom Set (1/2" scale), including Arrow Spindle Bed and One Drawer Commode: (Part 1) 15:4 (25-30); (Part 2, including Triple Dresser & mirror and a Chest on Chest) 16:1 (17-21)
Faking a Sideboard: 6:3 (13-15)
A Feast Made for Laughter: The Christmas Cover Kitchen (Judee Williamson): 5:1 (4)
Federal Drawing Room Furniture (Federal Sofa, Easy Chair, and New York Sofa Table): 16:4 (5-13)
Federal Period North Carolina Hunt Board (Banding & Veneering): 13:1 (5-12)
Fold-Away Metal Bed: 13:3 (17-21)
For the Southwestern Room...Gate-Leg Table and Low Joined Stool: 16:3 (33-38)
Furniture of the American Colonial Period: 14:1 (5-6)
French Art Nouveau Cabinet: 14:2 (31-37)
French Bed Side Table: 10:3 (5-11)
French Canadian Armoire: 12:4 (5-13)
French Chest: Part 2 French Bedroom Suite: 10:2 (29-36)
A French Paneled Bed: Framed Bed Panels From a Scratch Tool (Part 1 of French Furniture Series): 10:1 (5-13)
From Desert to Miniature: Victorian Renaissance Center Table: 5:3 (44-47)
A Garden House for Summer: An Introduction: 9:2 (4-6)
George III Library Ladder: 14:4 (5-15)
Greene & Greene Living Room Table & Chair: (Part 1) 16:1 (25-30); (Part 2) 16:2 (38-41)
Green & Green Fern Stand: 20:2 (23-24)
Harmonious Confusion: An Oak Roll Top Office Desk: 3:4 (23-38)
Haywood-Wakefield Modern Dining Set: (Part 1--China Cabinet, Side Board) 19:1 (25-37); (Part 2--Dining Table and Dining Side Chair) 19:2 (5-12)
Historic Preservation in Quarter Inch Scale: The Christiansburg Depot (c. 1868): 9:2 (18-24)
The Hollins College Lady's Desk: 8:4 (20-23)
The Home Workshop: Ted Roubal Talks About His Multi-disciplinary Shop Facilities: 8:4 (44-45)
House Power...in a Coal Shed: 8:6 (25-33)
In Search of a Face With Skew & gouge: Hand Carving a Canadian Art Nouveau Rocker: 9:1 (28-34)
An Introduction to Hand-Woven Caning (Revised from 1:3): 17:2 (14-16)
Jacobean Chest with drawers (c. 1680): 14:1 (12-18)
John Hall Legacy: John Meeks' Chaise Gondole: 13:4 (18-22)
John Leonard's High Density Workshop: 15:3 (25-26)
"Just Leave them in the Rack..." Making a Wire Dish Rack (Beginner's Workbench): 9:2 (40-44)
Knee Deep in June: Leisure Furniture of the Early 1900's (essay): 1:4 (23-24)
Late 18th Century Connecticut Chest-on-Chest: 19:4 (5-14)
Late Empire: A Neglected Era in Miniatures: 13:4 (5-6)
Like Two Peas in a Pod: A Contemporary Commode: 3:2 (22-26)
Linear Measurement and Tools (Cabinetmaker's Shop Manual): 1:1 (23-28)
Mahogany Campaign Bed (c. 1810): 15:1 (34-40)
Making and Using Mortising Chisels: 15:1 (21-24)
Measurement Conversion: 3:4 (Insert)
Metalworking With Hand Tools: A Popcorn Popper from the Van Horn Collection: 4:2 (24-28)
Mid-Victorian Renaissance-Style Cottage Bedroom: (Part 1) 17:3 (25-32); (Part 2) 17:4 (5-20)
Mudejar
and the Southwestern American Room: 16:2 (5-6)
Multi-Display Workhorse Transformer: 7:3 (22-28)
New Lebanon Shaker Sewing Room: 16:3 (5-6)
A Period Room from the 1940s (Photo Essay): 6:3 (4-9)
Philadelphia Chippendale Sofa (c. 1750-1780)
Philadelphia Spice Box on Frame: 14:2 (11-15)
Profile of a Craftsman: Don Buttfield: 1:1 (4-5)
Queen Anne Corner Table: 12:2 (19)
Regency-Style Double Gate Leg Table: 13:1 (40-48)
A Retrospective: Helen Dorsett, 1927-1990: 14:2 (5-10)
Scratch-built Window Assembly with Northeaster Materials: 12:1 (30-35)
Serpentine-Front Corner Cabinet: 11:4 (7-12)
Setting the Crooked Straight: The Morris Chair: 6:4 (13-18)
Shaker Sewing Desk: 16:3 (7-10)
Shaker Swivel Sewing Stool: 16:3 (11-15)
Sharpening Carving Tools (The Beginner's Workbench): 10:3 (51-55)
A Sitting Room in Summer (1875) (Essay): 5:4 (4)
Stickley Paneled Fireside Bench: 20:2 (9-12)
Table Saw Beveling Jig: 16:2 (44-47)
Table Saw Safety (The Beginner's Workbench): 10:4 (35-39)
Thinking in Scale (Beginner's Workbench) Essay: 11:3 (35-37)
Traditional French Canadian: An Introduction: 11:4 (5-6)
True or False? The Shooting Board: 10:2 (21-24)
Using the Dremel Drill Press (The Beginner's Workbench): 8:2 (23-28)
Victorian Folding Yacht Chair: 18:4 (6-11)
Victorian Italianate Architecture: An Introduction: 9:3 (4-6)
Victorian Renaissance Secretary (c. 1870): 11:3 (25-28)
Wainscot Arm Chair (c. 1690): 14:1 (6-11)
Whitman House: A Retrospective: 1:4 (16-19)
Why Scale? 1:1 (1-3)
Why Scale...and The Scale Cabinetmaker (An Editorial Essay): 5-7)
William and Mary Lowboy (c. 1710): 14:1 (19-22)
Wooden Toys for a 19th Century Christmas: 7:1 (7-10)
Working with the Dremel Moto-Lathe (Cabinetmaker's Shop Manual): 1:3 (31-34)

Jim (James) Dorsett was not only the editor and publisher (and writer and draftsman and photographer and janitor) of The Scale Cabinetmaker, he was also a craftsmen in his own right and was known for creating precision models, including a model of an 1880 Eastlake Rolltop desk in cherry, the only miniature to appear on the front cover of Fine Woodworking. Unlike Helen, who's professional career was built around miniatures, Jim's career was built around language and writing, both as a Sociologist & Social Historian (History of Social Thought) and as a Presbyterian minister, which goes a long way in explaining the number of social history essays woven into the fabric of The Scale Cabinetmaker.

Jim and Helen Dorsett (see indiviual listings)

Basic Furniture Joinery with Hand Tools (Beginner's Workbench): (Part 1) 8:5 (16-21); (Part 2) 8:6 (18-24) ; (Part 3) Locating & Preparing Dowel Joints: 9:1 (23-27)
Building a Simple Bookcase: The Beginner's Workbench: 3:3 (43-51)
Building Furniture with Commercial Turnings: 8:1 (12-17)
Can Tom Chippendale Find Happiness in Suburbia: 2:1 (33-43)
Chippendale Easy Chair from Newport (c. 1740-1750): 14:2 (13-22)
The Country Look in Furniture: 1940 Cushman (Chest on Chest, Panel Bed, Bedside Stand, Dresser, Mirror, and Bench): 12:1 (5-14)
...Next to Godliness: A Sheraton Night Table: 2:2 (22-27)
On the Margin of Respectability: A Mission Billiard Table and Davenport: 3:2 (4-10)
Planning A Kit Bashed House (Part 2): 3:1 (5-10) Note: Part 1 is listed as Detailing A Federal Period Row House in TSC 2:4)
Queen Anne For the 20th Century: A Realife Dining Room Kitbash: 8:6 (34-39)
Riding Toys From the Adult World: A Bent-wood Sled (c. 1877) and Pedal Car (c. 1914): 3:1 (33-44)
Table Saw Blade & Fence Adjustment: 8:4 (13-17)
Table Saw Safety (Beginner's Workbench): 8:3 (12-16)

Meghan Dorsett

And Now This...Adirondack Chair: 19:1 (48)
Carving Miscellany (Cabinetmaker's Notebook): 19:1 (22-24)
A Glossary of Cabinet Joints: 18:4 (25-29)
Linoleum Rugs from the 1920's: 18:3 (41-49)
Stalking the Electronic Mouse: Computer Generated Single & Speckled Tile Floors: 18:2 (5-16)
Using the Internet as a Source of Scale Images: 20:1 (25-34)

Current publisher, editor, and chief janitor at Dorsett Publications. Like her father, Meghan started out in a much different fields that miniatures, including working as a printer and graphic designer, teaching college English, and finally as a county-level long range planner. In 2008, when she took over and regenerated Dorsett Publications, she expanded the catalog to include urban planning books and a journal, The Community Planner, to the list of titles published by company. She learned how to build miniatures as a teenager when she made the mistake of announcing "I'm bored" to Helen, who promptly handed her a stack of chair legs and some sandpaper.

Dube, Don

High Volume Frame Cutting: A Sliding Mitering Jib for the Dremel Table Saw: 8:5 (43-45)

Eastin, Donald C.

Miter Gauge: 17:4 (3)

Elliot, Joan

“Ince to the Foot.” 4:1 (4-9)

Farrer, Colin

Miniature Marquetry: 19:3 (12-18, 38)

Fisher, Marcy

By the Chimney With Care: A Petite Petit Point Stocking: 3:1 (22-26)

Futer, Christopher W.

Tricycle Baby Carriage (c. 1870): 7:2 (29-40)

Gehrke, Edward and Helen

Building an Antique Trunk (c. 1672). 4:1(10-14)

As with many of contributors over the years, miniatures was a family affair for Edward and Helen Gehrke, of Lewiston, ID. Both loved building miniatures and their passion showed in their one article for TSC. Edward Gehrke was a machinist by trade and his precision in his machine shop showed in his miniatures as well.

Gray, John

Andirons, Fireirons, and Accessories: 10:4 (47-48)
Clothes Wringer (c. 1900): 6:4 (25-26)
Electric Hand Drill Lathe/Sander: (7:2) 13-19
The Franklin Fireplace Stove: 6:3 (10-12)
The Friendly Machine: A Shop-Built Belt Grinder Sander: 8:5 (36-42)
Pot Bellied Stove (Acme, c. 1900): 6:2 (14-16)
Sears, Roebuck Kitchen Range (c. 1905): 8:3 (45-53)
Three Centuries of Warmth: Fireplaces and Fireboxes: 10:3 (29-35)

John Gray has the distinction of creating some of those most beatifully drawn plans for TSC and for creating power tools from existing tools on the average garage workbench. Like many of the contributors in TSC, John approached the construction process from the view of someone who was intimately knowledgeable about tools and was willing to share his wide-ranging expertise with beginning and advanced modelers alike.

Grosse, Hillman R.

Spinning Wheel: (Part 1) 7:4 (4-13); 8:1 (40-53)

Among other things, Hillman R. Grosse holds a patent on centering fixture for wood turning lathes.

Gura, Joseph L.

Dremel Drill Press Improvements: Horizontal and Vertical Adjustments: 9:2 (38-39)
Micro-Adjusting Scale Rip Fence: 10:1 (38-41)

 

 

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Last Updated: 27 October, 2014
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